Category Archives: critical archival studies

New book: Shadow Archives

Just out from Columbia University Press is Shadow Archives: The Lifecycles of African American Literature by Jean-Christophe Cloutier. This title may be of interest for its central focus on literary archives and in particular how Cloutier “provides a nuanced view of how archival methodology, access, and the power dynamics of acquisitions shape literary history”. More […]

Designing the Archive, Adelaide, October 2019

The program is now available for Designing the Archive in Adelaide, 21-25 October 2019. “The conference theme Designing the Archive is about putting people at the centre of what we do. It provides an opportunity to explore how data and information managers, records managers and archivists are using, or can use, human-centred design approaches to ensure we deliver […]

The taste of the archive in the digital age: article

Quite exciting to locate this article today via the Documentary Heritage News digest: Le goût de l’archive à l’ère numérique published  in La vie des idées. Anyone familiar with Arlette Farge’s book will immediately recognise the reference and also the importance of seeking to extend her thinking into the digital era. By the time Farge’s wonderful […]

CFP: Archival Thinking: Genealogies and Archaeologies

Archival Science has circulated a call for papers for a special issue on “Archival Thinking: Genealogies and Archaeologies”.

CFP: Translation Archives

A special issue of the journal Meta: Translators’ Journal  is planned with a focus on the archives of literary translators. It is to be co-edited by Anthony Cordingley (University of Sydney) and Patrick Hersant (Université Paris-8). Literary authorship has long been studied from a genetic perspective, yet only recently have literary translators’ working documents—their research […]

Must-read essay: Archive and Library

Just recently posted on Humanities Commons is this wonderful essay, “Archive and Library” by Marlene Manoff. It is a pre-publication posting of an invited essay for the Oxford Encyclopedia of Literary Theory  – part of the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Literature. Abstract:  Archives and libraries operate within a complex web of social, political and economic […]

On “routine and frankly boring” archival labour

There have been several high profile Twitter interventions lately on the question of archival “discoveries”. In a timely blog post on the language scholars use to (mis)characterise archival settings, Beth Doyle makes the very important point that the same language inevitably displaces the very real (and gendered) labour of archivists, labour that invariably underpins scholars’ […]